Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Fonts Galore!

Fonts add a lot to your image. The font itself can make a statement or set a mood. There are even seasonal fonts to customize your image for any occasion.

Need or want more fonts?
Make sure that your Creative Cloud is active.
Click on the option bar  and select the down arrow next to the font name.
You'll see the "Add fonts from Typekit" option to click on.

.....


Select the font you want and click on "Use fonts". I selected "Hucklebuck" in the case.



I now have Hucklebuck available in my font list.

Monday, October 10, 2016

New features in Liquify!

Just when you thought the Liquify tool couldn't get any better, the latest updates in CC take Liquify to an all new level of usability and fun.
Photoshop's Liquify tool is now "face aware". What that means is when you decide to edit a nose, Photoshop knows where the nose, eyes, ears, mouth, etc. are and is ready to help you make subtle changes.


I wanted to give Bob here a little bit more of a small and widen the eyes just a bit. Instead of having to grab the proper tool and start editing, I just selected the mouth and eye option in the new tool panel that you get with Liquify.

Some of these new options include editing for the eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape.
If there is more than one face in the photo, you can even tell Photoshop which face to edit.

The Liquify tool has just become more user friendly and a big time saver when I want to use it!

Here's more about the new features in Liquify from Adobe:
https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/how-to/face-aware-liquify.html




Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Photoshop - White Balance Basics

 A white or gray object in a scene takes on the color cast by the ambient light or flash used to shoot the picture. Cameras don't always see color the way our eyes do and light bulbs can cause color casting problems as seen in the photo below.

There are some handy tools in the Camera Raw Filter in PS CC. Simply go to Filter > Camera Raw.
Use the White Balance tool  to specify an object that you want white or gray, Camera Raw can determine the color of the light in which the scene was shot and then adjust for scene lighting automatically. In this example, I selected the eye dropper tool then click on the ceiling which I knew should be white or neutral color (gray).

Here are the results.

Photoshop removed color that shouldn't be there and the room appears the same as when I was viewing it.
You can always use the Auto feature to let Photoshop read the Metadata that came with the image.

You can get good results by using this tool too.
The best part is, no matter which tool you select, you can always tweak the temperature of the image by simply sliding the Temperature bar a bit until you are happy with your photo.
No more jaundice photos. Enjoy!

Tuesday, August 02, 2016

The power of using Adjustment Layers

Adjustment layers are a nondestructive way to make edits to your photos. Adjustment layers allow you to make edits without damaging the original image and allow you to go back to make small adjustments as desired.
In the photo below, the background for this band student is distracting.  I wanted to tone down the background by making it much darker.
I selected the Adjustment layer icon in the bottom of the Layers panel and selected the Exposure option. Then I made the entire photo darker by moving the slider to the left.
This also made the subject in the photo dark too. However, the beauty of Adjustment layers is that they automatically come with a mask. In the photo below, I selected the mask and painted in the mask with black to reveal the original parts of the photo I wanted in the layer below.
Note: You should always use a soft edged brush with edits and don't forget that you can change the opacity of what you are painting/revealing in the Options bar. Make sure you have the mask part of the icon selected when painting.

Since this is an Adjustment layer, I'm able to change or darken the exposure of the background even more if I change my mind. I selected the Adjustment icon in the layer and slide the Exposure to be even darker. The mask we created continues to allow the original exposure in the photo to show in the untouched layer below.
At any time, I could delete the Adjustment layer and start over. Or, continue to tweek my mask and exposure settings on this Adjustment layer that we have created.
That's the beauty of Adjustment layers. The original photo in the layer below (Background) is never damaged. And, I can continue to work on the adjustment layer as needed. Keep in mind, you'll need to save your document as a .psd file if you ever want to go back to work on your adjustment layer again.



Tuesday, July 05, 2016

The amazing Quick Selection tool

Need to make a quick selection. Don't rule out the Quick Selection tool. It might be hidden under the Magic Wand Tool.

The Quick Selection Tool works by allowing you to paint a selection, with the selection snapping to details as you select. 
Follow these steps:
  • Select the Quick Selection Brush
  • Click the Brush menu in the Options bar to set a brush size.
  • Choose from the following options:
    • Sample All Layers: makes a selection based on all layers in an image.
    • Auto-Enhance: reduces roughness in the selection boundary.
  • Paint over the part of the image you want to select. As you paint near the edges of a shape, the selection area extends to follow the shape edge.
  • After making the first selection, the tool's option changes automatically to Add to Selection. Continue painting to select more pixels.
  • To remove pixels from a selection, click the Subtract from Selection option in the Options bar, then drag over an area that is already selected.

The Quick Selection Tool is great for selecting large areas of similarity like backgrounds, skies or similar colors.

Monday, June 20, 2016

What is purple fringing and how to I get rid of it?

There is a lot of debate about what causes purple fringing. Some people refer to it as chromatic aberration and it usually appears as a purple edge around dark objects against a bright sky.
However it occurs and whatever you want to call it I am always disappointed when it happens in my photo.
Let's take a look at an example and how you can get rid of it if it happens to you.
Look in the upper right middle of the photo. You'll see an example of this purple fringing that I'm talking about.
The next photo I'm zoomed in and you can easily see the purple fringing.
There is a tool in Photoshop just for this particular problem. You'll find in under Filter and going into Camera Raw.
After entering Camera Raw click on the Lens Correction icon. 
Make sure you have the Color tab selected and start adjusting the Defringe for Purple. Here I slide the amount back to 13. Keep making adjustments while zoomed into the photo. When the purple edges are gone, just click OK.
And, just like magic, all purple edges are gone!

Thursday, May 26, 2016